Imitative Production of Rising Speech Intonation in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients Purpose This study investigated the acoustic characteristics of pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients' imitative production of rising speech intonation, in relation to the perceptual judgments by listeners with normal hearing (NH). Method Recordings of a yes–no interrogative utterance imitated by 24 prelingually deafened children with a CI were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   October 01, 2007
Imitative Production of Rising Speech Intonation in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shu-Chen Peng
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Linda J. Spencer
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Richard R. Hurtig
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Contact author: Shu-Chen Peng, Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742. E-mail: speng@hesp.umd.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   October 01, 2007
Imitative Production of Rising Speech Intonation in Pediatric Cochlear Implant Recipients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2007, Vol. 50, 1210-1227. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/085)
History: Received September 8, 2006 , Accepted February 26, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2007, Vol. 50, 1210-1227. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/085)
History: Received September 8, 2006; Accepted February 26, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Purpose This study investigated the acoustic characteristics of pediatric cochlear implant (CI) recipients' imitative production of rising speech intonation, in relation to the perceptual judgments by listeners with normal hearing (NH).

Method Recordings of a yes–no interrogative utterance imitated by 24 prelingually deafened children with a CI were extracted from annual evaluation sessions. These utterances were perceptually judged by adult NH listeners in regard with intonation contour type (non-rise, partial-rise, or full-rise) and contour appropriateness (on a 5-point scale). Fundamental frequency, intensity, and duration properties of each utterance were also acoustically analyzed.

Results Adult NH listeners' judgments of intonation contour type and contour appropriateness for each CI participant’s utterances were highly positively correlated. The pediatric CI recipients did not consistently use appropriate intonation contours when imitating a yes–no question. Acoustic properties of speech intonation produced by these individuals were discernible among utterances of different intonation contour types according to NH listeners' perceptual judgments.

Conclusions These findings delineated the perceptual and acoustic characteristics of speech intonation imitated by prelingually deafened children and young adults with a CI. Future studies should address whether the degraded signals these individuals perceive via a CI contribute to their difficulties with speech intonation production.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were presented at the 8th International Cochlear Implant Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana (2004) and at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (2004). Funding of this project was provided by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant P50 DC00242. This article was primarily based on one study of the first author’s doctoral dissertation submitted to the University of Iowa. We would like to express our gratitude to all cochlear implant recipients, their parents, and adult normal-hearing listeners who participated in the present study. We would also like to thank Chris Turner, Arthur Boothroyd, Kay Gfeller, Sandie Bass-Ringdahl, and Monita Chatterjee for their helpful feedback and comments on earlier versions of this article. We appreciate Arik Wald for providing programming support and Nelson Lu for his assistance in statistical analysis.
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