Article/Report  |   October 2007
Enhanced Visual Speech Perception in Individuals With Early-Onset Hearing Impairment
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Edward T. Auer, Jr., Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, University of Kansas, Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Room 3001, Lawrence, KS 66045-7555. E-mail: auer@ku.edu.
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Hearing
Article/Report   |   October 2007
Enhanced Visual Speech Perception in Individuals With Early-Onset Hearing Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research October 2007, Vol.50, 1157-1165. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/080)
History: Accepted 04 Jan 2007 , Received 31 Jan 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research October 2007, Vol.50, 1157-1165. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/080)
History: Accepted 04 Jan 2007 , Received 31 Jan 2006

Purpose: L. E. Bernstein, M. E. Demorest, and P. E. Tucker (2000)  demonstrated enhanced speechreading accuracy in participants with early-onset hearing loss compared with hearing participants. Here, the authors test the generalization of Bernstein et al.'s (2000)  result by testing 2 new large samples of participants. The authors also investigated correlates of speechreading ability within the early-onset hearing loss group and gender differences in speechreading ability within both participant groups.

Method: One hundred twelve individuals with early-onset hearing loss and 220 individuals with normal hearing identified 30 prerecorded sentences presented 1 at a time from visible speech information alone.

Results: The speechreading accuracy of the participants with early-onset hearing loss (M = 43.55% words correct; SD = 17.48) significantly exceeded that of the participants with normal hearing (M = 18.57% words correct; SD = 13.18), t(330) = 14.576, p < .01. Within the early-onset hearing loss participants, speechreading ability was correlated with several subjective measures of spoken communication. Effects of gender were not reliably observed.

Conclusion: The present results are consistent with the results of Bernstein et al. (2000) . The need to rely on visual speech throughout life, and particularly for the acquisition of spoken language by individuals with early-onset hearing loss, can lead to enhanced speechreading ability.

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