Article/Report  |   August 2007
The Language Experience and Proficiency Questionnaire (LEAP-Q): Assessing Language Profiles in Bilinguals and Multilinguals
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Viorica Marian, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, 2240 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208. E-mail: v-marian@northwestern.edu.
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article/Report   |   August 2007
The Language Experience and Proficiency Questionnaire (LEAP-Q): Assessing Language Profiles in Bilinguals and Multilinguals
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 2007, Vol.50, 940-967. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/067)
History: Accepted 02 Oct 2006 , Received 13 Mar 2006 , Revised 25 Jul 2006
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research August 2007, Vol.50, 940-967. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/067)
History: Accepted 02 Oct 2006 , Received 13 Mar 2006 , Revised 25 Jul 2006

Purpose: To develop a reliable and valid questionnaire of bilingual language status with predictable relationships between self-reported and behavioral measures.

Method: In Study 1, the internal validity of the Language Experience and Proficiency Questionnaire (LEAP-Q) was established on the basis of self-reported data from 52 multilingual adult participants. In Study 2, criterion-based validity was established on the basis of standardized language tests and self-reported measures from 50 adult Spanish–English bilinguals. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were established on healthy adults whose literacy levels were equivalent to that of someone with a high school education or higher.

Results: Factor analyses revealed consistent factors across both studies and suggested that the LEAP-Q was internally valid. Multiple regression and correlation analyses established criterion-based validity and suggested that self-reports were reliable indicators of language performance. Self-reported reading proficiency was a more accurate predictor of first-language performance, and self-reported speaking proficiency was a more accurate predictor of second-language performance. Although global measures of self-reported proficiency were generally predictive of language ability, deriving a precise estimate of performance on a particular task required that specific aspects of language history be taken into account.

Conclusion: The LEAP-Q is a valid, reliable, and efficient tool for assessing the language profiles of multilingual, neurologically intact adult populations in research settings.

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