Estimating Mandibular Motion Based on Chin Surface Targets During Speech Purpose The movement of the jaw during speech and chewing has frequently been studied by tracking surface landmarks on the chin. However, the extent to which chin motions accurately represent those of the underlying mandible remains in question. In this investigation, the movements of a pellet attached to the incisor ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2007
Estimating Mandibular Motion Based on Chin Surface Targets During Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jordan R. Green
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Erin M. Wilson
    Waisman Center
  • Yu-Tsai Wang
    School of Dentistry, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan
  • Christopher A. Moore
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Jordan R. Green, Department of Special Education and Communication Disorders, University of Nebraska–Lincoln, 318 Barkley Center, Lincoln, NE 68583. E-mail: jgreen4@unl.edu.
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 2007
Estimating Mandibular Motion Based on Chin Surface Targets During Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 928-939. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/066)
History: Received June 2, 2006 , Accepted January 2, 2007
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 928-939. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/066)
History: Received June 2, 2006; Accepted January 2, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24

Purpose The movement of the jaw during speech and chewing has frequently been studied by tracking surface landmarks on the chin. However, the extent to which chin motions accurately represent those of the underlying mandible remains in question. In this investigation, the movements of a pellet attached to the incisor of the mandible were compared with those of pellets attached to different regions of the chin.

Method Ten healthy talkers served as participants. Three speaking contexts were recorded from each participant: word, sentence, and paragraph. Chin position errors were estimated by computing the standard distance between the mandibular incisor pellet and the chin pellets.

Results Relative to the underlying mandible, chin pellets moved with an average absolute and relative error of 0.81 mm and 7.30%, respectively. The movements of chin and mandibular pellets were tightly coupled in time.

Conclusion The chin tracking errors observed in this investigation are considered acceptable for descriptive studies of oromotor behavior, particularly in situations where mandibular placements are not practical (e.g., young children or edentulous adults). The observed amount of error, however, may not be tolerable for fine-grained analyses of mandibular biomechanics. Several guidelines are provided for minimizing error associated with tracking surface landmarks on the chin.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grants R03DC04643 and R01 DC06463 (awarded to the first author) and R01 DC000822 (awarded to the fourth author) from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by the Barkley Trust. We would like to acknowledge Pascal van Lieshout, Antje Mefferd, Ignatius Nip, Gary Weismer, and Yana Yunusova for providing feedback on early drafts of this article; David Wilson for computer programming; Mike Jackson for preparing the artwork; Carl Johnson for data collection and postprocessing; and John Westbury for providing access to the XRMB facility.
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