Auditory Performance Characteristics of the Computerized Revised Token Test (CRTT) Purpose To assess the Computerized Revised Token Test (CRTT) performance of individuals with normal hearing under several intensity conditions and under several spectral and temporal perturbation conditions. Method Sixty normal-hearing listeners were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 provided performance-intensity information about CRTT performance using ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2007
Auditory Performance Characteristics of the Computerized Revised Token Test (CRTT)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia A. Eberwein
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pittsburgh, PA, and University of Pittsburgh
  • Sheila R. Pratt
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, and University of Pittsburgh
  • Malcolm R. McNeil
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and University of Pittsburgh
  • Tepanta R. D. Fossett
    VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System and Necessity Consulting, Mars, PA
  • Neil J. Szuminsky
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, and University of Pittsburgh
  • Patrick J. Doyle
    Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, and University of Pittsburgh
  • Contact author: Cynthia A. Eberwein, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Audiology and Speech Pathology, 7180 Highland Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15206. E-mail: Cynthia.Eberwein@va.gov.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2007
Auditory Performance Characteristics of the Computerized Revised Token Test (CRTT)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 865-877. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/061)
History: Received May 12, 2006 , Accepted December 17, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 865-877. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/061)
History: Received May 12, 2006; Accepted December 17, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose To assess the Computerized Revised Token Test (CRTT) performance of individuals with normal hearing under several intensity conditions and under several spectral and temporal perturbation conditions.

Method Sixty normal-hearing listeners were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups. Group 1 provided performance-intensity information about CRTT performance using uncompressed acoustic stimuli. Groups 2 and 3 completed the CRTT using temporally and spectrally compressed and expanded stimuli. CRTT performance functions were plotted for each group.

Results Group 1 required minimal audibility to perform maximally on this task. As expected, Groups 2 and 3 showed significant differences across subtests, regardless of distortion condition. Mean differences in performance between successive conditions for Group 2 increased beyond 40% time compressed. There was 1 significant difference for the time-expanded condition. There were no differences across frequency compressed and expanded conditions.

Conclusion Young listeners require limited signal gain on the CRTT to achieve maximum performance. Time and frequency compression and expansion results were consistent with previous findings with varying types of speech stimuli. The results have implications for administration and interpretation of the CRTT administered to persons from other populations and will help in the development of a normative database for the CRTT.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by VA Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Review Project C3118R and by the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center. Cynthia A. Eberwein was supported by a Veteran’s Health Administration Pre-Doctoral Fellowship during part of the time spent conducting this research. Special thanks go to the University of Pittsburgh Psychology Department for their assistance in participant recruitment. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Elaine Rubinstein in preparing the statistics for this project. We also thank Dorothy Yang for her help in data collection.
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