A Performance Curve for Assessing Change in Percentage of Consonants Correct–Revised (PCC-R) Purpose Interpreting the rapidly changing speech skills of young children recovering from neurological injury is difficult because developmental expectations are generally available only at relatively lengthy intervals (e.g., 6 or 12 months). In this research note, the authors describe the process of generating a Percentage of Consonants Correct–Revised (PCC-R; L. ... Research Note
Research Note  |   August 01, 2007
A Performance Curve for Assessing Change in Percentage of Consonants Correct–Revised (PCC-R)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas F. Campbell
    University of Texas at Dallas
  • Christine Dollaghan
    University of Texas at Dallas
  • Janine E. Janosky
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • P. David Adelson
    University of Pittsburgh and Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh
  • Contact author: Thomas F. Campbell, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235. E-mail: thomas.f.campbell@utdallas.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language / Research Note
Research Note   |   August 01, 2007
A Performance Curve for Assessing Change in Percentage of Consonants Correct–Revised (PCC-R)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 1110-1119. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/077)
History: Received July 21, 2006 , Accepted December 7, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 1110-1119. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/077)
History: Received July 21, 2006; Accepted December 7, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

Purpose Interpreting the rapidly changing speech skills of young children recovering from neurological injury is difficult because developmental expectations are generally available only at relatively lengthy intervals (e.g., 6 or 12 months). In this research note, the authors describe the process of generating a Percentage of Consonants Correct–Revised (PCC-R; L. D. Shriberg, D. Austin, B. A. Lewis, J. L. McSweeny, & D. L. Wilson, 1997a) performance curve and illustrate some of its applications for assessing change in performance over time.

Method The authors compiled mean PCC-R scores from 16 samples of typically developing children (18–172 months) and used curve fitting to test more than 11,000 statistical models of monthly growth in PCC-R. They selected a parsimonious and developmentally plausible model with R2 = .9839 (p < .0005) and used it to generate the PCC-R, standard deviation, and standard error expected at each monthly age.

Results The PCC-R performance curve distinguished among 65 children (37–57 months of age) diagnosed independently with normal or disordered speech with a high degree of success. More important, the PCC-R performance curve can be used to identify the points at which children (18–172 months) recovering from neurological injury achieve normal-range consonant production.

Conclusion The curve-fitting approach holds promise as a means of interpreting temporal variations in speech production at a finer grain than existing normative data currently allow.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Grants R01DC0368, R01DC00822, and R01DC00496 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by Grant M01RR00084 from the General Clinical Research Center at the Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We thank Lawrence Shriberg and the staff of the Phonology Project at the University of Wisconsin–Madison for completing the speech analyses for the children. We are also indebted to Denise Balason, Jennifer Black, Jill Brady, Stacy Carr, Tammy Nash, Stephanie Nixon, Dayna Pitcairn, and Heather Rusiewicz for their assistance in completing this study.
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