The Relationship Among Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary, Listening Comprehension, Pre-Reading Skills, Word Identification Skills, and Reading Comprehension by Children With Reading Disabilities Purpose: Some researchers (F. R. Vellutino, F. M. Scanlon, & M. S. Tanzman, 1994) have argued that the different domains comprising language (e.g., phonology, semantics, and grammar) may influence reading development in a differential manner and at different developmental periods. The purpose of this study was to examine proposed ... Article/Report
Article/Report  |   August 2007
The Relationship Among Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary, Listening Comprehension, Pre-Reading Skills, Word Identification Skills, and Reading Comprehension by Children With Reading Disabilities
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Justin C. Wise, Georgia State University, 1400 Decatur Street, SE, Suite 1151, Atlanta, GA 30303. E-mail: psyjcwx@langate.gsu.edu.
  • © 2007 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Development / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article/Report   |   August 2007
The Relationship Among Receptive and Expressive Vocabulary, Listening Comprehension, Pre-Reading Skills, Word Identification Skills, and Reading Comprehension by Children With Reading Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 1093-1109. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/076)
History: Received January 25, 2006 , Revised June 30, 2006 , Accepted December 18, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2007, Vol. 50, 1093-1109. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/076)
History: Received January 25, 2006; Revised June 30, 2006; Accepted December 18, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 59

Purpose: Some researchers (F. R. Vellutino, F. M. Scanlon, & M. S. Tanzman, 1994) have argued that the different domains comprising language (e.g., phonology, semantics, and grammar) may influence reading development in a differential manner and at different developmental periods. The purpose of this study was to examine proposed causal relationships among different linguistic subsystems and different measures of reading achievement in a group of children with reading disabilities.

Methods: Participants were 279 students in 2nd to 3rd grade who met research criteria for reading disability. Of those students, 108 were girls and 171 were boys. In terms of heritage, 135 were African and 144 were Caucasian. Measures assessing pre-reading skills, word identification, reading comprehension, and general oral language skills were administered.

Results: Structural equation modeling analyses indicated receptive and expressive vocabulary knowledge was independently related to pre-reading skills. Additionally, expressive vocabulary knowledge and listening comprehension skills were found to be independently related to word identification abilities.

Conclusion: Results are consistent with previous research indicating that oral language skills are related to reading achievement (e.g., A. Olofsson & J. Niedersoe, 1999; H. S. Scarborough, 1990). Results from this study suggest that receptive and expressive vocabulary knowledge influence pre-reading skills in differential ways. Further, results suggest that expressive vocabulary knowledge and listening comprehension skills facilitate word identification skills.

Acknowledgments
Support for this research was provided by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant HD30970 to Georgia State University, Tufts University, and the Hospital for Sick Children/University of Toronto, and by the Research Program Enhancement Fund of Georgia State University. We thank our participants and their families for their cooperation and support.
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