The Application of Tissue Engineering Procedures to Repair the Larynx The field of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine combines the quantitative principles of engineering with the principles of the life sciences toward the goal of reconstituting structurally and functionally normal tissues and organs. There has been relatively little application of tissue engineering efforts toward the organs of speech, voice, and hearing. The ... Tutorial
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Tutorial  |   February 01, 2006
The Application of Tissue Engineering Procedures to Repair the Larynx
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert L. Ringel
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Joel C. Kahane
    The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Peter J. Hillsamer
    Lafayette Otolaryngology Associates, Lafayette, IN
  • Annie S. Lee
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Stephen F. Badylak
    University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Contact author: Joel C. Kahane, School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, The University of Memphis, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, TN 38105. Email: jckahane@memphis.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   February 01, 2006
The Application of Tissue Engineering Procedures to Repair the Larynx
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2006, Vol. 49, 194-208. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/016)
History: Received August 18, 2005 , Accepted September 7, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2006, Vol. 49, 194-208. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/016)
History: Received August 18, 2005; Accepted September 7, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 23

The field of tissue engineering/regenerative medicine combines the quantitative principles of engineering with the principles of the life sciences toward the goal of reconstituting structurally and functionally normal tissues and organs. There has been relatively little application of tissue engineering efforts toward the organs of speech, voice, and hearing. The present manuscript describes a study that was conducted in which a biologic scaffold derived from porcine (pig) extracellular matrix (ECM) was used to repair the defect following a hemilaryngectomy procedure in dogs. The ECM-augmented repair was compared with a control standard strap muscle (STM) procedure. The animals were sacrificed after 24 weeks at which time anatomic and histologic analyses were conducted. The ECM repair resulted in a macroscopic and microscopic reconstruction of laryngeal tissue that was superior to that observed with the STM procedure. The importance of regenerated tissue having the same structural and functional characteristics of native tissue is emphasized. A discussion of the mechanisms of ECM remodeling is presented along with the implications of such remodeling in the repair of laryngeal structures.

Acknowledgments
We wish to acknowledge the support for this research by the Purdue Research Foundation to Robert L. Ringel; the Center of Excellence Award Program of the Tennessee Board of Higher Education to the Anatomical Sciences Laboratory and the School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, The University of Memphis, Tennessee, to Joel C. Kahane; and National Institute of Health Research Grant R01 EB000506-01A1 to Stephen F. Badylak.
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