Temporal Processing Deficits in Hebrew Speaking Children With Reading Disabilities The purpose of this study was to assess to what extent specific reading disabilities and poor phonologic processing in children who read Hebrew, a primarily consonant orthography, are related to central auditory temporal processing deficits (TPDs). Twenty-four Hebrew-speaking children (ages 10–13) with and without reading disabilities were asked to discriminate ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2006
Temporal Processing Deficits in Hebrew Speaking Children With Reading Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ravit Cohen- Mimran
    University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel
  • Contact author: Ravit Cohen-Mimran, Department of Communication Disorders, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa 31905, Israel. Email: rmimran@univ.haifa.ac.il
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2006
Temporal Processing Deficits in Hebrew Speaking Children With Reading Disabilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2006, Vol. 49, 127-137. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/010)
History: Received August 4, 2004 , Revised April 14, 2005 , Accepted May 31, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2006, Vol. 49, 127-137. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/010)
History: Received August 4, 2004; Revised April 14, 2005; Accepted May 31, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

The purpose of this study was to assess to what extent specific reading disabilities and poor phonologic processing in children who read Hebrew, a primarily consonant orthography, are related to central auditory temporal processing deficits (TPDs).

Twenty-four Hebrew-speaking children (ages 10–13) with and without reading disabilities were asked to discriminate auditorily pairs of syllables (/ba/ vs. /pa/) that differ by voice onset time (VOT) only. Two paradigms were used, 1 with a short interstimulus interval (ISI) (50 ms) and 1 with a long ISI (500 ms). Event-related potentials (ERPs) were measured in response to the two syllables in an auditory oddball task.

Results showed significantly lowered accuracy, longer reaction times, and prolonged P3 latency among the group with reading disabilities compared with the control group. No significant differences were found between the short ISI task and the long ISI task. However, significant correlations were found between the phonologic processing tasks and the short ISI task.

These findings in the Hebrew language are consistent with findings from other languages and add support to the central TPD hypothesis of reading disabilities. The discussion highlights how investigating different orthographic systems can deepen our understanding of the role TPD plays in reading.

Acknowledgments
This work is partially based on a dissertation completed by the author under the direction of Zvia Breznitz at the Laboratory for Neurocognitive Research, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa, Israel. The author appreciates the contribution of Zvia Breznitz to this manuscript.
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