Effect of Cues to Increase Sound Pressure Level on Respiratory Kinematic Patterns During Connected Speech Purpose This study examined the response of the respiratory system to 3 cues used to elicit increased vocal loudness to determine whether the effects of cueing, shown previously in sentence tasks, were present in connected speech tasks and to describe differences among tasks. Method Fifteen young men and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2007
Effect of Cues to Increase Sound Pressure Level on Respiratory Kinematic Patterns During Connected Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica E. Huber
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana
  • Contact author: Jessica E. Huber, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, 1353 Heavilon Hall, 500 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47906-2038. E-mail: jhuber@purdue.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2007
Effect of Cues to Increase Sound Pressure Level on Respiratory Kinematic Patterns During Connected Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2007, Vol. 50, 621-634. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/044)
History: Received January 12, 2006 , Revised July 25, 2006 , Accepted September 22, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2007, Vol. 50, 621-634. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/044)
History: Received January 12, 2006; Revised July 25, 2006; Accepted September 22, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

Purpose This study examined the response of the respiratory system to 3 cues used to elicit increased vocal loudness to determine whether the effects of cueing, shown previously in sentence tasks, were present in connected speech tasks and to describe differences among tasks.

Method Fifteen young men and 15 young women produced a 2-paragraph reading passage in response to 4 different loudness cues: comfortable loudness level, targeting 10 dB above comfortable, at what they perceived as twice their comfortable loudness, and with multitalker noise present in the background. A short monologue was produced at comfortable loudness level and with noise in the background.

Results Differences in respiratory strategies were demonstrated for the different cueing conditions, similar to patterns observed in sentence productions. The kinematic patterns were similar for reading and monologue; however, utterances were longer and speaking rate was slower in the monologue task.

Conclusion The findings extend the results from sentences to connected speech and provide support for the hypothesis that “intention” or goals play a role in the control of respiratory function during speech. Respiratory kinematics were similar across tasks, when the same cue was used, except for differences related to breath group length and speech rate.

Acknowledgment
This research was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R03DC05731-01.
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