Physiologic Development of Tongue–Jaw Coordination From Childhood to Adulthood Purpose This investigation aimed to examine the development of tongue–jaw coordination during speech from childhood to adolescence. Method Electromagnetic articulography was used to track tongue and jaw motion in 48 children and adults (aged 6–38 years) during productions of /t/ and /k/ embedded in sentences. Results ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2007
Physiologic Development of Tongue–Jaw Coordination From Childhood to Adulthood
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hei Yan Cheng
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Bruce E. Murdoch
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Justine V. Goozée
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Dion Scott
    The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Contact author: Hei Yan Cheng, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. E-mail: y.cheng@shrs.uq.edu.au.
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2007
Physiologic Development of Tongue–Jaw Coordination From Childhood to Adulthood
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2007, Vol. 50, 352-360. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/025)
History: Received December 6, 2005 , Revised May 8, 2006 , Accepted July 19, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2007, Vol. 50, 352-360. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/025)
History: Received December 6, 2005; Revised May 8, 2006; Accepted July 19, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose This investigation aimed to examine the development of tongue–jaw coordination during speech from childhood to adolescence.

Method Electromagnetic articulography was used to track tongue and jaw motion in 48 children and adults (aged 6–38 years) during productions of /t/ and /k/ embedded in sentences.

Results The coordinative organization of the tongue and jaw exhibited changes until the age of 8–11 years and continued to undergo refinement into late adolescence. The tongue–tip and tongue–body were observed to develop unique kinematic relations with the jaw. While tongue–tip movement became increasingly synchronized with jaw movement, tongue–body and jaw retained movement independence but developed a more consistent kinematic relation.

Conclusion The present results support the notion that speech motor development is nonuniform, with a refinement period from mid-childhood to late adolescence.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by Research Grant 2002000902 from the Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation, The University of Queensland, Australia. The authors would like to thank Jordan Green for helpful advice on methods of data analysis.
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