Perceptual Weighting of Stop Consonant Cues by Normal and Impaired Listeners in Reverberation Versus Noise Purpose To determine if listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss give different perceptual weightings to cues for stop consonant place of articulation in noise versus reverberation listening conditions. Method Nine listeners with normal hearing (23–28 years of age) and 10 listeners with sensorineural hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   April 01, 2007
Perceptual Weighting of Stop Consonant Cues by Normal and Impaired Listeners in Reverberation Versus Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark S. Hedrick
    The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Mary Sue Younger
    The University of Tennessee, Knoxville
  • Contact author: Mark S. Hedrick, Department of Audiology and Speech Pathology, 578 South Stadium Hall, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-0740. E-mail: mhedric1@utk.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   April 01, 2007
Perceptual Weighting of Stop Consonant Cues by Normal and Impaired Listeners in Reverberation Versus Noise
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2007, Vol. 50, 254-269. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/019)
History: Received June 24, 2005 , Revised February 1, 2006 , Accepted June 16, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2007, Vol. 50, 254-269. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/019)
History: Received June 24, 2005; Revised February 1, 2006; Accepted June 16, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

Purpose To determine if listeners with normal hearing and listeners with sensorineural hearing loss give different perceptual weightings to cues for stop consonant place of articulation in noise versus reverberation listening conditions.

Method Nine listeners with normal hearing (23–28 years of age) and 10 listeners with sensorineural hearing loss (31–79 years of age, median 66 years) participated. The listeners were asked to label the consonantal portion of synthetic CV stimuli as either /p/ or /t/. Two cues were varied: (a) the amplitude of the spectral peak in the F4/F5 frequency region of the burst was varied across a 30-dB range relative to the adjacent vowel peak amplitude in the same frequency region, (b) F2/F3 formant transition onset frequencies were either appropriate for /p/, /t/ or neutral for the labial/alveolar contrast.

Results Weightings of relative amplitude and transition cues for voiceless stop consonants depended on the listening condition (quiet, noise, or reverberation), hearing loss, and age of listener. The effects of age with hearing loss reduced the perceptual integration of cues, particularly in reverberation. The effects of hearing loss reduced the effectiveness of both cues, notably relative amplitude in reverberation.

Conclusions Reverberation and noise conditions have different perceptual effects. Hearing loss and age may have different, separable effects.

Acknowledgments
Support for this project was provided, in part, by Grant 1 R55 DC03682 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. We thank Cliff Franklin for his assistance in data collection.
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