F2 Locus Equations: Phonetic Descriptors of Coarticulation in 17- to 22-Month-Old Children The general purpose of this research was to describe coarticulation across voiced stop consonant place of articulation in 10 children younger than 2 years of age. A total of 1,182 voiced stop CV productions was analyzed using the locus equation metric, which yielded 3 regression lines that described the relation ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2007
F2 Locus Equations: Phonetic Descriptors of Coarticulation in 17- to 22-Month-Old Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Terrie Gibson
    Hollywood, MD
  • Ralph N. Ohde
    Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center for Otolaryngology and Communication Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center
  • Contact author: Terrie Gibson, 24562 Spriggs Court, Hollywood, MD 20636. E-mail: mom_4_ever@excite.com.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2007
F2 Locus Equations: Phonetic Descriptors of Coarticulation in 17- to 22-Month-Old Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2007, Vol. 50, 97-108. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/008)
History: Received January 4, 2006 , Accepted May 15, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2007, Vol. 50, 97-108. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/008)
History: Received January 4, 2006; Accepted May 15, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

The general purpose of this research was to describe coarticulation across voiced stop consonant place of articulation in 10 children younger than 2 years of age. A total of 1,182 voiced stop CV productions was analyzed using the locus equation metric, which yielded 3 regression lines that described the relation of F2 onset and F2 vowel for /bV/, /dV/, and /gV/ productions. The results revealed significant differential effects for slope and y-intercept as a function of stop consonant place of articulation. The ordering of the mean slope values for stop consonant place of articulation was /g/>/b/ and /d/, indicating that /g/ was produced with significantly greater coarticulation than /b/ or /d/. However, the unique vowel allophonic pattern of [g] coarticulation reported in the literature for English-speaking adults was generally not learned by these young children. Group and individual coarticulation trends are described in relation to developmental theories of sound acquisition. Results suggest that early coarticulation patterns are phoneme specific.

Acknowledgments
The study was based on a doctoral dissertation completed at Vanderbilt University by the first author under the direction of the second author. This research was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants 1R03DC4034-01A1 and DC00523-08. The authors express their sincere gratitude to the dissertation committee of Dan Ashmead, Jo-Anne Bachorowski, Stephen Camarata, and Russell Love; to Terell Lasane, Eric Hiris, Louis Hicks, Margaret O’Brien, Michael Freeman, and Stephen Crump for assistance with various aspects of the project; and to Kylie Beck for the preparation of the figure. We extend our most sincere thanks to the children and their parents who participated in this research, without whose cooperation, help, and patience such a study could not have been completed.
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