Chest Wall Motion During Speech Production in Patients With Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis Purpose To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production. Method The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45±8 years, Schober ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2007
Chest Wall Motion During Speech Production in Patients With Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Georgia Kalliakosta
    University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece, and “Laiko” General Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Charalampos Mandros
    University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece, and “Laiko” General Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • George E. Tzelepis
    University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece, and “Laiko” General Hospital, Athens, Greece
  • Contact author: George E. Tzelepis, Department of Pathophysiology, University of Athens Medical School, 75 M. Asias Street, Athens 11527, Greece. E-mail: gtzelep@med.uoa.gr.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2007
Chest Wall Motion During Speech Production in Patients With Advanced Ankylosing Spondylitis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2007, Vol. 50, 109-118. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/009)
History: Received July 19, 2005 , Revised December 10, 2005 , Accepted May 23, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2007, Vol. 50, 109-118. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/009)
History: Received July 19, 2005; Revised December 10, 2005; Accepted May 23, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose To test the hypothesis that ankylosing spondylitis (AS) alters the pattern of chest wall motion during speech production.

Method The pattern of chest wall motion during speech was measured with respiratory inductive plethysmography in 6 participants with advanced AS (5 men, 1 woman, age 45±8 years, Schober test 1.45±1.5 cm, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index [BASFI] score 6±1.7) and 6 healthy volunteers, matched for age and gender. Measurements were made with participants in the upright seated and upright standing body position.

Results During reading in the seated and standing body positions, the rib cage wall volume displacements were smaller and abdominal wall volume displacements were larger in participants with AS than in healthy controls. There were no differences in the overall lung volume displacements recorded during the expiratory limb of reading in either body position. In the participants with AS, the rib cage remained near the end-expiratory level in both the seated and standing body position, differing from that for the control group.

Conclusion In individuals with advanced AS, the abdomen is the primary contributor to volume displacement. In the absence of speech impairment in participants with AS, the data show the capacity of the abdomen to compensate for the decreased compliance of the rib cage.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access