Response to “Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy: A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes,” by Blomgren, Roy, Callister, and Merrill (2005) Purpose M. Blomgren, N. Roy, T. Callister, and R. Merrill (2005)  used a multidimensional approach to evaluate treatment efficacy for the Successful Stuttering Management Program. While the article acknowledged that the treatment program under evaluation does not target a reduction in stuttering frequency, Blomgren and colleagues concluded that the therapy ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   December 01, 2006
Response to “Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy: A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes,” by Blomgren, Roy, Callister, and Merrill (2005)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Peter Reitzes
    Brooklyn Public Schools, Brooklyn, NY
  • Gregory Snyder
    The University of Mississippi, University, MS
  • Contact author: Peter Reitzes, Public School 94, 5010 6th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11220. E-mail: preitzes@yahoo.com.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   December 01, 2006
Response to “Intensive Stuttering Modification Therapy: A Multidimensional Assessment of Treatment Outcomes,” by Blomgren, Roy, Callister, and Merrill (2005)
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2006, Vol. 49, 1420-1422. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/103)
History: Received December 23, 2005 , Accepted February 18, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2006, Vol. 49, 1420-1422. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/103)
History: Received December 23, 2005; Accepted February 18, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose M. Blomgren, N. Roy, T. Callister, and R. Merrill (2005)  used a multidimensional approach to evaluate treatment efficacy for the Successful Stuttering Management Program. While the article acknowledged that the treatment program under evaluation does not target a reduction in stuttering frequency, Blomgren and colleagues concluded that the therapy “was ineffective in producing durable reductions of core stuttering behaviors, such as stuttering frequency and severity.” In this response, it is suggested that Blomgren et al. used inappropriate treatment efficacy measures relative to the therapy program under evaluation, subsequently making the study’s data difficult to interpret.

Conclusion It is suggested that stuttering treatment efficacy measures include client-reported treatment satisfaction data, efficacy measures relative to the goals and values of the therapy approach being evaluated, and data relative to the documented values and priorities of those within the stuttering population.

Acknowledgments
Greg Snyder and Peter Reitzes should be considered equal authors of this letter.
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