Dysgraphia in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review for Clinical and Research Purposes Purpose: This article presents a critical review of literature on dysgraphia associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Research presented includes discussions of central and peripheral spelling impairments as well as the impact of general, nonlinguistic cognitive functions on dysgraphia associated with AD.Method: The studies critically reviewed were from a ... Theoretical/Review Article
Theoretical/Review Article  |   December 2006
Dysgraphia in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review for Clinical and Research Purposes
 
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Stacy Harnish, 1100 Wyoming Street, Dayton, OH 45410. E-mail: sulfrism@email.uc.edu.
  • © 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Language
Theoretical/Review Article   |   December 2006
Dysgraphia in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Review for Clinical and Research Purposes
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2006, Vol. 49, 1313-1330. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/094)
History: Received August 14, 2005 , Revised January 2, 2006 , Accepted April 20, 2006
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2006, Vol. 49, 1313-1330. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/094)
History: Received August 14, 2005; Revised January 2, 2006; Accepted April 20, 2006
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose: This article presents a critical review of literature on dysgraphia associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Research presented includes discussions of central and peripheral spelling impairments as well as the impact of general, nonlinguistic cognitive functions on dysgraphia associated with AD.

Method: The studies critically reviewed were from a variety of disciplines, with emphasis on seminal work, recent literature, and the first author’s research.

Conclusions: Studies have shown that writing impairment is heterogeneous within the AD population; however, there are certain aspects of the writing process that are more vulnerable than others and may serve as diagnostic signs. Identifying patterns of writing impairment at different stages of AD may help to chart disease progression and assist in the development of appropriate interventions.

Acknowledgments
A portion of the research reviewed was supported by a First Independent Research and Transition Award and by National Institute of Neurological and Communication Disorders and Stroke Grant DC00741 (Jean Neils, principal investigator, with David Roeltgen, collaborator).
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