Auditory Training and Speech Discrimination Thirty-two adults with sensorineural hearing loss participated in a short-term auditory training program. The listeners were assigned to one of four matched groups which were equivalent in pure-tone sensitivity, speech-reception threshold, PB discrimination in quiet and in noise, intelligence, age, education, duration of loss, sex, and hearing-aid use. Each group ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1970
Auditory Training and Speech Discrimination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel L. Bode
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
  • Herbert J. Oyer
    Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1970
Auditory Training and Speech Discrimination
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1970, Vol. 13, 839-855. doi:10.1044/jshr.1304.839
History: Received September 5, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1970, Vol. 13, 839-855. doi:10.1044/jshr.1304.839
History: Received September 5, 1969

Thirty-two adults with sensorineural hearing loss participated in a short-term auditory training program. The listeners were assigned to one of four matched groups which were equivalent in pure-tone sensitivity, speech-reception threshold, PB discrimination in quiet and in noise, intelligence, age, education, duration of loss, sex, and hearing-aid use. Each group responded during training to a different combination of listening condition (S/N varied or S/N-constant) and speech material (closed-set or open-set response formats).

Statistically significant increase in auditory discrimination was shown on the W-22 and Rhyme tests, while the increase revealed by the Semi-Diagnostic test was not significant. Results indicated that the two listening conditions were equally effective. Similarly, the two types of training material brought about equivalent increases in overall speech discrimination.

Trends suggested that open-set and closed-set training each had most effect on the respective type of speech discrimination. In addition, improvement in auditory discrimination was associated with those individuals who were oldest, with those who had highest intelligence, and with those who responded to training material at the most intense presentation level. Finally, listeners who reported the most hearing handicap also tended to show the greatest loss in speech reception and in speech discrimination in noise.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access