Perception of Simultaneous Dichotic and Monotic Monosyllables Competing rhyming pairs of both natural and synthetic speech were presented both monotically and dichotically to normal right-handed listeners. When the onsets of the words were simultaneous (±2½ msecs), the right ear scores were generally higher than the left ear scores. However, voiceless consonants were much more intelligible dichotically than ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1970
Perception of Simultaneous Dichotic and Monotic Monosyllables
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sena S. Lowe
    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • John K. Cullen, Jr.
    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Charles I. Berlin
    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Carl L. Thompson
    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Mary E. Willett
    Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1970
Perception of Simultaneous Dichotic and Monotic Monosyllables
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1970, Vol. 13, 812-822. doi:10.1044/jshr.1304.812
History: Received September 12, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1970, Vol. 13, 812-822. doi:10.1044/jshr.1304.812
History: Received September 12, 1969

Competing rhyming pairs of both natural and synthetic speech were presented both monotically and dichotically to normal right-handed listeners. When the onsets of the words were simultaneous (±2½ msecs), the right ear scores were generally higher than the left ear scores. However, voiceless consonants were much more intelligible dichotically than voiced consonants, regardless of which ear received the voiceless consonant. When both consonants competed monotically, the difference between voiced and voiceless consonant perception was either reversed or markedly attenuated. An explanation based on lagging of the aperiodic-to-periodic transition of the voiceless CV is offered.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access