Phonemic Variability in Apraxia of Speech Articulatory performance in the condition apraxia of speech (variously designated aphemia, Broca’s aphasia, motor aphasia, and cortical dysarthria) was analyzed in 10 patients and compared with the performance of 10 dysarthric and 10 normal subjects. Testing ruled out perceptual impairment and muscular weakness or incoordination as the cause of articulatory ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1970
Phonemic Variability in Apraxia of Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donnell F. Johns
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida
  • Frederic L. Darley
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1970
Phonemic Variability in Apraxia of Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1970, Vol. 13, 556-583. doi:10.1044/jshr.1303.556
History: Received May 16, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1970, Vol. 13, 556-583. doi:10.1044/jshr.1303.556
History: Received May 16, 1969

Articulatory performance in the condition apraxia of speech (variously designated aphemia, Broca’s aphasia, motor aphasia, and cortical dysarthria) was analyzed in 10 patients and compared with the performance of 10 dysarthric and 10 normal subjects. Testing ruled out perceptual impairment and muscular weakness or incoordination as the cause of articulatory errors of the apraxic group.

Initial consonant production in speech apraxia is characterized by a high degree of inconsistency of articulation errors; predominance of substitution, repetition, and addition errors as opposed to distortion errors of dysarthria; marked prosodic disturbance without phonatory and resonatory changes; increase of difficulty from spontaneous to oral reading to imitative speech conditions; facilitation of correct articulation by visual monitoring in the auditory-visual stimulus mode in contrast to the auditory (repeating tape-recorded stimuli) or visual (reading words) modes; deterioration of articulation with increase in length of word; and improvement when the patient is allowed to make several consecutive attempts to produce a desired response.

Such aberrations in programming of articulatory movements in volitional speech in the absence of significant impairment of language comprehension and muscular weakness fit well within the generic term apraxia. They warrant a therapeutic approach distinct from approaches effective in aphasia and dysarthria.

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