Reassembly of Segmented CVC Syllables by Children This study tested the perception-resynthesis performance of 80 normal-speaking first and third grade children. Stimuli consisted of 10 pairs of meaningful and meaningless CVC syllables. Phonemes were spoken in isolation and CVC syllables prepared with silent intervals of 50, 100, 200, and 400 msec between the phonemes. Children listened to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1970
Reassembly of Segmented CVC Syllables by Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas H. Shriner
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts
  • Raymond G. Daniloff
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1970
Reassembly of Segmented CVC Syllables by Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1970, Vol. 13, 537-547. doi:10.1044/jshr.1303.537
History: Received February 3, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1970, Vol. 13, 537-547. doi:10.1044/jshr.1303.537
History: Received February 3, 1969

This study tested the perception-resynthesis performance of 80 normal-speaking first and third grade children. Stimuli consisted of 10 pairs of meaningful and meaningless CVC syllables. Phonemes were spoken in isolation and CVC syllables prepared with silent intervals of 50, 100, 200, and 400 msec between the phonemes. Children listened to these constructions and were asked to speak (reassemble) the CVC heard. Results indicate that correct responses significantly decrease as silent intervals are increased. Meaningless CVC syllables were much less easily resynthe-sized at all intervals than meaningful syllables. No significant differences were found between first and third grade children. The results are discussed in terms of the model used as the basis of the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities as related to recent findings in coarticulation research.

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