Perstimulatory Tracking in Pitch Perception by Subjects with Sensorineural Hearing Loss The pitch of continuous fatiguing tones was tracked over time by six subjects who demonstrated sensorineural hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and possible significance of perstimulatory tracking in pitch perception by subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. Perstimulatory tracking was done at three frequencies: ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1970
Perstimulatory Tracking in Pitch Perception by Subjects with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul Skinner
    Auditory Research Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
  • Frank Antinoro
    Auditory Research Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1970
Perstimulatory Tracking in Pitch Perception by Subjects with Sensorineural Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1970, Vol. 13, 518-525. doi:10.1044/jshr.1303.518
History: Received August 6, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1970, Vol. 13, 518-525. doi:10.1044/jshr.1303.518
History: Received August 6, 1969

The pitch of continuous fatiguing tones was tracked over time by six subjects who demonstrated sensorineural hearing loss. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and possible significance of perstimulatory tracking in pitch perception by subjects with sensorineural hearing loss. Perstimulatory tracking was done at three frequencies: 500, 2500, and 4500 Hz, and at two intensities, a moderate and a high sensation level. The duration of fatiguing stimuli varied from 3 to 8 minutes, depending on the frequency and intensity of the stimuli. Immediately after cessation of the continuous tone, poststimulatory tracking was done with pulsed tones at low sensation levels to observe the recovery trend from any observed shifts in pitch. Temporary pitch shift (TPS) was not evident at 500 Hz; however, TPS was observed for all of the conditions at 2500 and 4500 Hz. These findings were compared to observed TPS and recovery in subjects with normal hearing.

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