Speaking Fundamental Frequency Characteristics of Five- and Six-Year-Old Children with Mongolism Spontaneous speech samples of 27 children with trisomy-21 type Down’s syndrome and 66 normal children were tape-recorded and analyzed for mean fundamental frequency, standard deviation, and range. Results indicate that the mean speaking fundamental frequency (SFF) level for the sample of children with mongolism was significantly higher than the mean ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Speaking Fundamental Frequency Characteristics of Five- and Six-Year-Old Children with Mongolism
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bernd Weinberg
    Indiana University Medical Center, Indianapolis, Indiana
  • Marsha Zlatin
    National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, Maryland
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Speaking Fundamental Frequency Characteristics of Five- and Six-Year-Old Children with Mongolism
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 418-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.418
History: Received June 11, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 418-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.418
History: Received June 11, 1969

Spontaneous speech samples of 27 children with trisomy-21 type Down’s syndrome and 66 normal children were tape-recorded and analyzed for mean fundamental frequency, standard deviation, and range.

Results indicate that the mean speaking fundamental frequency (SFF) level for the sample of children with mongolism was significantly higher than the mean SFF level for the control sample. Approximately 50% of the children with mongolism had mean SFF levels exceeding the highest mean SFF level of their matched controls. In only two cases did the mean SFF for a child with mongolism fall below the mean SFF level for control children of the same age and sex. No child with mongolism exhibited a mean SFF level below the lowest mean SFF for any control subject. The subject in question is the clinical observation that children with mongolism typically have low voice fundamental frequency levels.

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