Effects of Simultaneous and Successive Stimulus Presentation on Visual Discriminations by Aphasic Patients In order to determine whether aphasic and nonaphasic subjects would perform differentially in simultaneous and successive discrimination tasks, 10 aphasic and 10 nonaphasic hospital patients performed in a successive and a simultaneous discrimination task in which 2 stimuli were presented on each trial, and in a successive discrimination with a ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Effects of Simultaneous and Successive Stimulus Presentation on Visual Discriminations by Aphasic Patients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Deedra L. Engmann
    University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas
  • Robert H. Brookshire
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Effects of Simultaneous and Successive Stimulus Presentation on Visual Discriminations by Aphasic Patients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 369-381. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.369
History: Received August 21, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 369-381. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.369
History: Received August 21, 1969

In order to determine whether aphasic and nonaphasic subjects would perform differentially in simultaneous and successive discrimination tasks, 10 aphasic and 10 nonaphasic hospital patients performed in a successive and a simultaneous discrimination task in which 2 stimuli were presented on each trial, and in a successive discrimination with a single stimulus presented on each trial. Aphasic and nonaphasic subjects learned the successive discrimination task with a single stimulus faster than the other two discriminations. When the discrimination involved two stimuli, simultaneous presentation of stimuli resulted in faster learning by aphasic subjects than did successive presentation. Learning of visual discriminations by aphasic and nonaphasic subjects appeared to occur all at once, rather than as gradual improvement over trials. The hypothesis that aphasic subjects would have difficulty with inhibition of responses to negative discriminative stimuli was not supported.

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