Low-Frequency Vowel Formant Discrimination in Hearing-Impaired Listeners Measurements of vowel formant discrimination were made on 6 listeners with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing losses and compared with discrimination in 4 normal listeners. The measure of discrimination was the size of the threshold for a frequency change in the formant of a synthetic vowel. An adaptive procedure was used to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Low-Frequency Vowel Formant Discrimination in Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • J. M. Pickett
    Gallaudet College, Washington, D. C.
  • J. Mártony
    Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Low-Frequency Vowel Formant Discrimination in Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 347-359. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.347
History: Received July 23, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 347-359. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.347
History: Received July 23, 1969

Measurements of vowel formant discrimination were made on 6 listeners with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing losses and compared with discrimination in 4 normal listeners. The measure of discrimination was the size of the threshold for a frequency change in the formant of a synthetic vowel. An adaptive procedure was used to locate threshold. Results indicated that, at two low formant locations, 205 and 275 Hz, sensorineural discrimination was equal to normal; at 400 and 875 Hz, however, the sensorineural subjects had less discrimination than normal. Learning to maximum discrimination performance was slow for the sensorineural subjects at the two higher formant locations. Formant frequency discrimination appeared to be insensitive to changes in sensation level. Tactual discrimination tests with the vowel stimuli indicated that the obtained performance levels for very poor discrimination may have reflected tactual discrimination rather than auditory discrimination.

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