Warbled Tone Masking in Bone-Conduction Audiometry Warbled tones are compared with narrow-band, wide-band, and complex noises with respect to their efficacy as air-conducted maskers. Bone-conducted pulsed tones of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were presented to the foreheads of eight normal-hearing subjects. With each masker presented binaurally and held constant at a nominal 40-dB level ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Warbled Tone Masking in Bone-Conduction Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William F. Prather
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Seattle, Washington
  • James L. Shapley
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Seattle, Washington
  • Raymond A. Smith
    Veterans Administration Hospital, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Warbled Tone Masking in Bone-Conduction Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 339-346. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.339
History: Received February 18, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 339-346. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.339
History: Received February 18, 1969

Warbled tones are compared with narrow-band, wide-band, and complex noises with respect to their efficacy as air-conducted maskers. Bone-conducted pulsed tones of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz were presented to the foreheads of eight normal-hearing subjects. With each masker presented binaurally and held constant at a nominal 40-dB level (re normal threshold for each noise) the results indicated that the effectiveness of the warbled tone was essentially comparable to that of the narrowband noise and was significantly better than the wide-band and complex noises over all frequencies combined. Some variation in efficacy was noted, however, as a function of individual frequencies. These results, plus those of the inter- and intra-subject reliabilities and the relative variabilities of the obtained masked thresholds, indicated that a warbled tone may have potential clinical usefulness as a masker.

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