Nasal Airflow Characteristics During Speech in Prosthetically Managed Cleft Palate Speakers This study was designed to provide descriptive aerodynamic articulatory data regarding prosthetically managed cleft palate speakers. The results suggest that (1) prosthetic management of cleft palate may limit the range of velopharyngeal opening for some individuals to the point where the same speaker may demonstrate both nasal and denasal speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Nasal Airflow Characteristics During Speech in Prosthetically Managed Cleft Palate Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James F. Lubker
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • James W. Schweiger
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
  • Hughlett L. Morris
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Nasal Airflow Characteristics During Speech in Prosthetically Managed Cleft Palate Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 326-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.326
History: Received December 2, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 326-338. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.326
History: Received December 2, 1968

This study was designed to provide descriptive aerodynamic articulatory data regarding prosthetically managed cleft palate speakers. The results suggest that (1) prosthetic management of cleft palate may limit the range of velopharyngeal opening for some individuals to the point where the same speaker may demonstrate both nasal and denasal speech characteristics; (2) small amounts of nasal airflow may be present during speech without listeners labeling that speech as being defective; (3) nasal airflow increases as oral constriction increases, other things being equal; (4) voiceless consonants are produced by prosthetically managed cleft palate speakers with greater nasal airflow than are voiced cognates; (5) prosthetically managed cleft palate speakers demonstrated more nasal airflow for voiceless fricatives than for voiceless plosives, and more for voiced plosives than for voiced fricatives; (6) the duration over which a consonant must be sustained may be more closely related to relative speech defectiveness than is the required peak pressure for that consonant; and (7) prosthetically managed cleft palate speakers with borderline closure appear to be less consistent in nasal airflow rate than the speakers with either very good or very poor closure.

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