Stuttering and Its Disappearance Spontaneous recovery was found in four-fifths of all stuttering cases. Data were obtained from 5138 students at the University of California, Berkeley and Los Angeles, of whom 147 had at some time been definitely categorized as stutterers. Severity was the most important factor related to probability of recovery. For those ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Stuttering and Its Disappearance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph G. Sheehan
    University of California, Los Angeles, California
  • Margaret M. Martyn
    Olive View Hospital, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Stuttering and Its Disappearance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 279-289. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.279
History: Received August 21, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 279-289. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.279
History: Received August 21, 1969

Spontaneous recovery was found in four-fifths of all stuttering cases. Data were obtained from 5138 students at the University of California, Berkeley and Los Angeles, of whom 147 had at some time been definitely categorized as stutterers. Severity was the most important factor related to probability of recovery. For those who had never been worse than mild, seven-eights recovered, while for those who had ever been severe, only one-half recovered. When severity was held constant, enrollment in public school therapy had no effect, positive or negative, upon the probability of eventual recovery. The fact that fewer of those who received public school therapy had recovered was primarily attributable to the finding that the severe were more likely to be enrolled.

Parent, teacher, or speech clinician diagnosis of stuttering was significantly related to assignment to public school therapy, while self-diagnosis was inversely related. Those who began with blocking and became severe were more likely to have continued as stutterers, while those who began with syllable repetition were more likely to have recovered. Although familial incidence was higher in stutterers than in normal controls, it did not distinguish those who continued to stutter from those in whom the problem had disappeared.

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