Laryngeal Correlates of Frequency Change: A STROL Study Vocal fold area and thickness were studied as a function of fundamental frequency of phonation using the stroboscopic-laminagraphic (STROL) technique. Two lamina-grams each were measured for seven adult male subjects phonating at fundamental frequencies of 98, 124, 155, and 196 Hz; the phonations were controlled also with respect to time ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Laryngeal Correlates of Frequency Change: A STROL Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harry Hollien
    University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
  • Robert F. Coleman
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Laryngeal Correlates of Frequency Change: A STROL Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 271-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.271
History: Received May 27, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 271-278. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.271
History: Received May 27, 1968

Vocal fold area and thickness were studied as a function of fundamental frequency of phonation using the stroboscopic-laminagraphic (STROL) technique. Two lamina-grams each were measured for seven adult male subjects phonating at fundamental frequencies of 98, 124, 155, and 196 Hz; the phonations were controlled also with respect to time (15 seconds/duration) and intensity (70 dB ±2 dB). Results indicate: (1) a moderate trend for vocal fold area to decrease with increasing fundamental frequency; (2) vocal fold thickness decreases with increasing fo of phonation—thus confirming earlier reports resulting from conventional laminagraphic techniques; and (3) greater intra-subject variability in laryngeal area and thickness may exist than was previously noted.

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