Comparison of Seven Systems for High-Frequency Air-Conduction Audiometry Seven equipment systems were assembled to examine human auditory acuity from 8 to 20 kHz. Two loudspeakers and two earphones were examined, together with two types of stimulus (pure tones and narrow bands of noise) and two psychometric methods (Limits and Adjustments). All systems were capable of providing usably reliable ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
Comparison of Seven Systems for High-Frequency Air-Conduction Audiometry
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecil K. Myers
    Submarine Medical Research Laboratory, Groton, Connecticut
  • J. Donald Harris
    Submarine Medical Research Laboratory, Groton, Connecticut
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
Comparison of Seven Systems for High-Frequency Air-Conduction Audiometry
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 254-270. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.254
History: Received April 11, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 254-270. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.254
History: Received April 11, 1969

Seven equipment systems were assembled to examine human auditory acuity from 8 to 20 kHz. Two loudspeakers and two earphones were examined, together with two types of stimulus (pure tones and narrow bands of noise) and two psychometric methods (Limits and Adjustments). All systems were capable of providing usably reliable thresholds on 28 ears throughout the whole frequency range. When carefully calibrated, several systems (those involving loudspeakers, as well as those involving earphones) yielded comparable reference threshold sound-pressure levels at the eardrum. A preference was expressed for a system using Bekesy threshold tracking with a changing-frequency noise band of 300 Hz, and for a discrete-tone system using the Method of Constants.

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