The Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback on a Speech-Related Task in Stutterers Fifteen adult stutterers and 15 matched nonstutterers who presented normal hearing and normal psychiatric and neurological histories were studied. Their responses were compared on a patterned syllable-repetition task under various auditory feedback conditions. The feedback signals were clicks activated by an electro-mechanical device at the time of lip closure. They ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1970
The Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback on a Speech-Related Task in Stutterers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rachel E. Stark
    The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
  • Bruce R. Pierce
    Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1970
The Effects of Delayed Auditory Feedback on a Speech-Related Task in Stutterers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 245-253. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.245
History: Received March 6, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1970, Vol. 13, 245-253. doi:10.1044/jshr.1302.245
History: Received March 6, 1969

Fifteen adult stutterers and 15 matched nonstutterers who presented normal hearing and normal psychiatric and neurological histories were studied. Their responses were compared on a patterned syllable-repetition task under various auditory feedback conditions. The feedback signals were clicks activated by an electro-mechanical device at the time of lip closure. They were either synchronous (SAF) or delayed (DAF) or a combination (SAF/DAF). SAF was presented by bone conduction at a 40-dB sensation level, DAF by binaural air conduction with a delay of 140 or 200 msec, at sensation levels of 0, 10, 20, and 30 dB in DAF alone and at sensation levels of 40, 50, 60, and 70 dB in the SAF/DAF combination. Performances were evaluated in terms of pattern duration, lip-closure duration, and number of pattern errors.

Stutterers and nonstutterers responded similarly to the feedback conditions. The following three differences were found: (1) during SAF alone, stutterers showed greater duration of lip closure than nonstutterers; (2) there were non-systematic differences between stutterers and nonstutterers in duration of lip closure during DAF and SAF/DAF conditions; and (3) with increased intensity of DAF, stutterers showed a greater increase in number of pattern errors than nonstutterers.

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