Coding Medium and Word Recall by Deaf and Hearing Subjects Forty deaf subjects were compared with 40 fifth graders with normal hearing on the learning of 16 English words. Eight of the words had sign equivalents; eight did not. The task consisted of eight study-test trials. Analysis of the mean number of correct responses showed higher recall of signable than ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1970
Coding Medium and Word Recall by Deaf and Hearing Subjects
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Penelope B. Odom
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Richard L. Blanton
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
  • Cynthia K. McIntyre
    Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1970
Coding Medium and Word Recall by Deaf and Hearing Subjects
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 54-58. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.54
History: Received September 27, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 54-58. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.54
History: Received September 27, 1968

Forty deaf subjects were compared with 40 fifth graders with normal hearing on the learning of 16 English words. Eight of the words had sign equivalents; eight did not. The task consisted of eight study-test trials. Analysis of the mean number of correct responses showed higher recall of signable than unsignable words. The deaf recalled all words better than the hearing, but this advantage was due primarily to the deaf’s superior recall of the signable words. It was concluded that having a single sign equivalent for a word facilitated its recall.

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