The Occlusion Effect in Unilateral Functional Hearing Loss Bone-conduction tests were administered to subjects who feigned a hearing loss in the right ear. The tests were conducted under two conditions: With and without occlusion of the non-test ear. It was anticipated that the occlusion effect, a well-known audiological principle, would operate to draw low frequency bone-conducted signals to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1970
The Occlusion Effect in Unilateral Functional Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gary Thompson
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
  • Marie Denman
    University of Washington, Seattle, Washington
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1970
The Occlusion Effect in Unilateral Functional Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 37-40. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.37
History: Received February 14, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 37-40. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.37
History: Received February 14, 1969

Bone-conduction tests were administered to subjects who feigned a hearing loss in the right ear. The tests were conducted under two conditions: With and without occlusion of the non-test ear. It was anticipated that the occlusion effect, a well-known audiological principle, would operate to draw low frequency bone-conducted signals to the occluded side in a predictable manner. Results supported this expectation and are discussed in terms of their clinical implications.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access