Articulatory Training of the Deaf using Low-Frequency Surrogate Fricatives This preliminary investigation attempted to determine whether training of the deaf using realtime acoustic displays of low-frequency surrogates for /s/ and /∫/ would aid in the improvement of the articulation of these phonemes. Each member of the experimental group received articulatory instruction largely devoted to fricatives while having auditory access ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1970
Articulatory Training of the Deaf using Low-Frequency Surrogate Fricatives
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Newman Guttman
    Bell Telephone Laboratories, Naperville, Illinois
  • Harry Levitt
    Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey
  • Philip A. Bellefleur
    Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1970
Articulatory Training of the Deaf using Low-Frequency Surrogate Fricatives
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 19-29. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.19
History: Received May 27, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 19-29. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.19
History: Received May 27, 1969

This preliminary investigation attempted to determine whether training of the deaf using realtime acoustic displays of low-frequency surrogates for /s/ and /∫/ would aid in the improvement of the articulation of these phonemes. Each member of the experimental group received articulatory instruction largely devoted to fricatives while having auditory access both to a teacher’s production of low-frequency surrogate fricatives and to simultaneous feedback of his own productions in the surrogate form. Members of a control group received similar instruction short of exposure to the surrogates. The results indicate that training with acoustic surrogate fricatives mildly facilitated improvement in articulation of /s/ and substantially facilitated articulation of /∫/.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access