Some Physiological Determinants to Autonomic Responsivity to Sound A pulse train of 80 dB (sensation level) served as auditory stimulus to evoke changes in the autonomic functions of heart rate, finger pulse volume, and respiration. Physiograph records from each of 20 normal persons (CA = 15 to 25 years) provided the data to examine the audiologic applicability of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1970
Some Physiological Determinants to Autonomic Responsivity to Sound
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald H. Hogan
    Plymouth State Home and Training School, Northville, Michigan
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1970
Some Physiological Determinants to Autonomic Responsivity to Sound
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 130-146. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.130
History: Received December 6, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 130-146. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.130
History: Received December 6, 1968

A pulse train of 80 dB (sensation level) served as auditory stimulus to evoke changes in the autonomic functions of heart rate, finger pulse volume, and respiration. Physiograph records from each of 20 normal persons (CA = 15 to 25 years) provided the data to examine the audiologic applicability of the psychophysiologic principles of “law of initial values” and “response stereotypy.” Analyses of response activity following four stimulus presentations yielded information concerning the salient features of these autonomic responses, habituation, response magnitude in startling vs nonstartling situations, and the improved audiometric sensitivity of multivariable recording. A new technique is described for evaluating respiration responses. Although preliminary, this study provides supportive evidence for using certain psychophysiologic methods for improving autonomic responsivity to sound.

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