Speechreading and the Synthesis of Distorted Printed Sentences The hypothesized relationship between subject performance on a speechreading task and on a task requiring synthesis of distorted orthographic material was examined. Fifty normal hearing college students responded to the Utley Sentence Test and to Everyday Speech sentences that had alternate second and third letters omitted from the printed copy. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1970
Speechreading and the Synthesis of Distorted Printed Sentences
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel L. Bode
    Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois
  • G. Patrick Nerbonne
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts
  • Lowell J. Sahlstrom
    Wisconsin State University, Eau Claire, Wisconsin
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1970
Speechreading and the Synthesis of Distorted Printed Sentences
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 115-121. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.115
History: Received January 17, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1970, Vol. 13, 115-121. doi:10.1044/jshr.1301.115
History: Received January 17, 1969

The hypothesized relationship between subject performance on a speechreading task and on a task requiring synthesis of distorted orthographic material was examined. Fifty normal hearing college students responded to the Utley Sentence Test and to Everyday Speech sentences that had alternate second and third letters omitted from the printed copy. Linear correlation between the two tasks (r = 0.36) was significant statistically, although practical predictive power was minimal. In developing orthographic tasks more similar to the speechreading situation, level of difficulty, temporal factors, and legibility should be considered. Comparison of present speechreading performance with standardization results suggested that sophisticated and unsophisticated viewers do not differ in sentence-recognition ability.

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