A Task for Evaluation of Articulation Change: III. Imitative Task Scores Compared with Scores for More Spontaneous Tasks Nineteen subjects with consistent misarticulations of at least one phoneme were provided with remedial speech instruction. Thirty-item imitative sound production tasks were administered on three occasions prior to instruction, once before each lesson, and one month after the final lesson. Thirty-item talking tasks were obtained four times: (1) prior to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1969
A Task for Evaluation of Articulation Change: III. Imitative Task Scores Compared with Scores for More Spontaneous Tasks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Virginia Wright
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas
  • Ralph L. Shelton
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas
  • William B. Arndt
    University of Missouri at Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1969
A Task for Evaluation of Articulation Change: III. Imitative Task Scores Compared with Scores for More Spontaneous Tasks
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 875-884. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.875
History: Received April 14, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 875-884. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.875
History: Received April 14, 1969

Nineteen subjects with consistent misarticulations of at least one phoneme were provided with remedial speech instruction. Thirty-item imitative sound production tasks were administered on three occasions prior to instruction, once before each lesson, and one month after the final lesson. Thirty-item talking tasks were obtained four times: (1) prior to instruction, (2) at a given midpoint, (3) before the final lesson, and (4) one month after the final lesson. A 30-item reading task was administered at one point during the study. The subjects were grouped according to a criterion level established for performance on the imitative task. Comparisons were made both within and between groups. These comparisons concerned articulation change as demonstrated by subjects' performances on the three tasks. Subjects made articulation improvement on the imitative task. They made less improvement on the reading task and much less improvement on the talking task.

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