The Influence of Prosody on Stuttering Adaptation Recently, Wingate proposed a two-factor theory to explain stuttering adaptation. His first factor consists of the stutterer’s psychophysiological adaptation to a situation. He designated prosodic (practice) variable as the second factor. For Wingate, prosodic adaptation involves the stutterer’s becoming more practiced at making transitional articulatory movements and coordinating articulation and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1969
The Influence of Prosody on Stuttering Adaptation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas E. Besozzi
    Canton Public Schools, Canton, Ohio
  • Martin R. Adams
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1969
The Influence of Prosody on Stuttering Adaptation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 818-824. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.818
History: Received September 17, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 818-824. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.818
History: Received September 17, 1968

Recently, Wingate proposed a two-factor theory to explain stuttering adaptation. His first factor consists of the stutterer’s psychophysiological adaptation to a situation. He designated prosodic (practice) variable as the second factor. For Wingate, prosodic adaptation involves the stutterer’s becoming more practiced at making transitional articulatory movements and coordinating articulation and phonation. If such is true, then it logically follows that the more oral reading practice allowed the stutterer, the more he should adapt. We tested this hypothesis.

Our investigation included two conditions. The Control Condition consisted of five consecutive oral readings of a prose passage. In the Experimental Condition a matched passage was read orally on Trials 1 and 5 and silently on Trials 2, 3, and 4. The silent readings were introduced to limit oral reading practice and hence prosodic adaptation. Statistically significant adaptation occurred under both conditions. However, significantly more adaptation was evident in the condition involving the greatest number of oral reading trials.

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