Stimuli and Intensity Factors in Testing Infants To acquire auditory normative data for infants, five types of sound stimuli were administered randomly at each of four hearing levels. Subjects were 21 three-month-old and 22 eight-month-old infants; all were screened to eliminate “high risk” babies and were considered to be developmentally normal. The five test stimuli (white noise, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 1969
Stimuli and Intensity Factors in Testing Infants
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gloria H. Hoversten
    University of California, Los Angeles, California
  • John P. Moncur
    University of California, Los Angeles, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 1969
Stimuli and Intensity Factors in Testing Infants
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 687-702. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.687
History: Received January 20, 1969
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 1969, Vol. 12, 687-702. doi:10.1044/jshr.1204.687
History: Received January 20, 1969

To acquire auditory normative data for infants, five types of sound stimuli were administered randomly at each of four hearing levels. Subjects were 21 three-month-old and 22 eight-month-old infants; all were screened to eliminate “high risk” babies and were considered to be developmentally normal. The five test stimuli (white noise, pulsed; 500 Hz, pulsed; 4000 Hz, pulsed; voice; and music) were presented in a sound-field through equidistant loudspeakers via tape. Behavioral changes were recorded by two observers. As predicted, percentage of response increased with increased hearing level. In order to reach the 50% point of response, hearing levels varying from 23 dB (voice stimulus) to 72 dB (4000 Hz stimulus) above normal adult threshold were necessary. Voice generally resulted in the largest percentage of responses for both age groups at each hearing level. The three-month-old infants generally gave fewer responses than the eight-month-old infants at comparable hearing levels.

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