Identification of Voiceless Fricatives by High Frequency Hearing Impaired Listeners Identification of voiceless fricatives was investigated in five subjects having steep hearing losses above 1000 Hz. Sixteen consonant-vowel test syllables were formed by combining each of the voiceless fricatives /s, ∫, f, θ/ with the vowels /i, e, o, u/. The fricatives were identified correctly as follows: /∫/ 87%; /s/ ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1969
Identification of Voiceless Fricatives by High Frequency Hearing Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald L. Lawrence
    Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
  • Vincent W. Byers
    Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1969
Identification of Voiceless Fricatives by High Frequency Hearing Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 426-434. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.426
History: Received June 5, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 426-434. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.426
History: Received June 5, 1968

Identification of voiceless fricatives was investigated in five subjects having steep hearing losses above 1000 Hz. Sixteen consonant-vowel test syllables were formed by combining each of the voiceless fricatives /s, ∫, f, θ/ with the vowels /i, e, o, u/. The fricatives were identified correctly as follows: /∫/ 87%; /s/ 83%; /f/ 77%; and /θ/ 72%. Subjects showed idiosyncratic fricative confusion patterns. Confusions of the fricatives generally divided into two groups: /s/ and /∫/ were confused one for the other, and /f/ and /θ/ one for the other. There were no vowel confusions; however, the fricatives were more often confused in association with the front vowels, /i/ and /e/, than with the back vowels, /u/ and /o/. Examination of the fricative syllables suggests that low frequency energy, intensity, and duration of the fricative sounds, as well as formant transitions of vowels are available to these subjects to serve as possible cues for voiceless fricative identification.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access