Interaction of Audition and Vision in the Recognition of Oral Speech Stimuli Audio-visual observation of spoken spondaic words was found to be superior to recognition via audition-only under a wide range of S/N conditions. Data from five subjects supported the notion that observers rely increasingly more on visual cues for speech information as S/N ratio is degraded. Audition-only performance was found to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1969
Interaction of Audition and Vision in the Recognition of Oral Speech Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Norman P. Erber
    Central Institute for the Deaf, St. Louis, Missouri
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1969
Interaction of Audition and Vision in the Recognition of Oral Speech Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 423-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.423
History: Received October 1, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 423-425. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.423
History: Received October 1, 1968

Audio-visual observation of spoken spondaic words was found to be superior to recognition via audition-only under a wide range of S/N conditions. Data from five subjects supported the notion that observers rely increasingly more on visual cues for speech information as S/N ratio is degraded. Audition-only performance was found to be less variable among subjects than was audio-visual recognition. Increased variability in audio-visual scores at poorer S/N ratios was attributed to differences in lip-reading skill among untrained subjects. Speech levels so low that recognition by audition-only approximated chance behavior were found, nevertheless, to systematically improve observers' audio-visual scores as a function of increasing S/N ratio.

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