A Study of the Relationship Between the Latency and Consistency of Stuttering Previous research indicates that the latency of learned responses is inversely related to the strength of the stimulus-response bond. If this is true for stuttering, then a word stuttered on the first of several massed oral readings should be a more potent stimulus and hence capable of promoting more consistent ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1969
A Study of the Relationship Between the Latency and Consistency of Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Louis J. Rosso
    Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois
  • Martin R. Adams
    Kent State University, Kent, Ohio
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1969
A Study of the Relationship Between the Latency and Consistency of Stuttering
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 389-393. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.389
History: Received July 1, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 389-393. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.389
History: Received July 1, 1968

Previous research indicates that the latency of learned responses is inversely related to the strength of the stimulus-response bond. If this is true for stuttering, then a word stuttered on the first of several massed oral readings should be a more potent stimulus and hence capable of promoting more consistent stuttering than other words stuttered for the first time on a subsequent reading. Within this framework, response latency is defined as the number of the reading trial on which any word is first stuttered. The present study was designed to determine whether such an inverse relationship exists between the latency and consistency of stuttering.

Subjects in this investigation were 20 stutterers, each of whom was tested individually. Each stutterer read orally, five times in succession, a 320-word, neutral prose passage while the experimenter marked consistent stutterings on a separate copy of the reading material. All results demonstrated the presence of the hypothesized inverse relationship. Attention is drawn to the fact that this same association is characteristic of learned responses, thus, indirectly supporting the concept that stuttering and learning are intimately related.

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