The Relationship Between Articulatory Deficits and Syntax in Speech Defective Children The relationship between articulatory deficits and the development of syntax in children with severe articulation problems was investigated. Subjects in the experimental group were 30 normal elementary school children, enrolled in grades one through three, who had severe problems with articulation. Thirty normal children, free from any articulation errors, served ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 1969
The Relationship Between Articulatory Deficits and Syntax in Speech Defective Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas H. Shriner
    University of Illinois, Champaign , Illinois
  • Mary Sayre Holloway
    Champaign Public Schools, Champaign, Illinois
  • Raymond G. Daniloff
    University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 1969
The Relationship Between Articulatory Deficits and Syntax in Speech Defective Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 319-325. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.319
History: Received May 31, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 1969, Vol. 12, 319-325. doi:10.1044/jshr.1202.319
History: Received May 31, 1968

The relationship between articulatory deficits and the development of syntax in children with severe articulation problems was investigated. Subjects in the experimental group were 30 normal elementary school children, enrolled in grades one through three, who had severe problems with articulation. Thirty normal children, free from any articulation errors, served as a control group. Children with defective articulation performed significantly less well in the areas of grammatical usage, and used shorter sentences. The relationship between phonological and syntactical errors is discussed, with implications for therapy.

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