Learning Limits of Deaf Children for Coded Speech Programmed instruction was used to train profoundly deaf subjects to crude limits of learning in the association of pictures and spoken words. The words differed only in consonant structure. The performance of three groups of six subjects were compared. One group received linearly amplified speech to both ears; another, coded ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1969
Learning Limits of Deaf Children for Coded Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel Ling
    McGill University and the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada
  • Donald G. Doehring
    McGill University and the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Canada
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1969
Learning Limits of Deaf Children for Coded Speech
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 83-94. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.83
History: Received August 19, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 83-94. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.83
History: Received August 19, 1968

Programmed instruction was used to train profoundly deaf subjects to crude limits of learning in the association of pictures and spoken words. The words differed only in consonant structure. The performance of three groups of six subjects were compared. One group received linearly amplified speech to both ears; another, coded speech to both ears; and the third, linearly amplified speech to the left ear and coded speech to the right. A control group of six children was trained without auditory cues. The three experimental groups showed significant improvement with training, but there was no significant difference between groups with respect to either performance at the limits of learning or number of repetitions required to reach the limits. Transposition of speech through coding did not improve the discrimination of consonants by the deaf children tested.

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