Imparting Diagnostic Information to Mothers: A Comparison of Methodologies This study sought to evaluate maternal understanding of information obtained during a diagnostic consultation by mothers of speech-handicapped children as a result of two replay procedures: Video Tape Replay (VTR) and Audio Tape Relay (ATR). A 35-item list (Communication Behavior Scale; CBS) of developmental levels in speech and language was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1969
Imparting Diagnostic Information to Mothers: A Comparison of Methodologies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy R. Marshall
    University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Oregon
  • Steven G. Goldstein
    University of Oregon Medical School, Portland, Oregon
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1969
Imparting Diagnostic Information to Mothers: A Comparison of Methodologies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 65-72. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.65
History: Received July 17, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 65-72. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.65
History: Received July 17, 1968

This study sought to evaluate maternal understanding of information obtained during a diagnostic consultation by mothers of speech-handicapped children as a result of two replay procedures: Video Tape Replay (VTR) and Audio Tape Relay (ATR).

A 35-item list (Communication Behavior Scale; CBS) of developmental levels in speech and language was constructed and validated. It consisted of items classified under the following variables: verbal comprehension, verbal communication, articulation ability, and intelligibility of speech.

One hundred twenty mothers of speech-handicapped children were divided into three groups of 40 each. All subjects, regardless of group, completed the CBS before and after they were seen by the diagnostician, a speech pathologist. Group I received only the regular diagnostic consultation from the speech pathologist; Group II (VTR) saw the entire diagnostic consultation again by video-tape replay; and Group III (ATR) heard the entire diagnostic consultation again by tape recording.

Statistically significant differences were found for all four variables between control and experimental groups. With one exception, no differences were found between the experimental groups. The implications of mechanical feedback and its utility in the diagnostic or research setting are discussed.

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