The Effects of Variable-Interval and Fixed-Interval Signal Presentation Schedules on the Auditory Evoked Response Averaged auditory evoked responses to 1000-Hz 20-msec tone bursts were obtained from normal-hearing adults under two different intersignal interval schedules: (1) a fixed-interval schedule with 2-sec intersignal intervals, and (2) a variable-interval schedule of intersignal intervals ranging randomly from 1.0 sec to 4.5 sec with a mean of 2 sec. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1969
The Effects of Variable-Interval and Fixed-Interval Signal Presentation Schedules on the Auditory Evoked Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Nelson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Frank M. Lassman
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Richard L. Hoel
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1969
The Effects of Variable-Interval and Fixed-Interval Signal Presentation Schedules on the Auditory Evoked Response
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 199-209. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.199
History: Received August 9, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 199-209. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.199
History: Received August 9, 1968

Averaged auditory evoked responses to 1000-Hz 20-msec tone bursts were obtained from normal-hearing adults under two different intersignal interval schedules: (1) a fixed-interval schedule with 2-sec intersignal intervals, and (2) a variable-interval schedule of intersignal intervals ranging randomly from 1.0 sec to 4.5 sec with a mean of 2 sec. Peak-to-peak amplitudes (N1 — P2) as well as latencies of components P1, N1, P2, and N2 were compared under the two different conditions of intersignal interval. No consistent or significant differences between variable- and fixed-interval schedules were found in the averaged responses to signals of either 20 dB SL or 50 dB SL. Neither were there significant schedule differences when 35 or 70 epochs were averaged per response. There were, however, significant effects due to signal amplitude and to the number of epochs averaged per response. Response amplitude increased and response latency decreased with sensation level of the tone burst.

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