The Effects of a Neutral Stimulus (Buzzer) on Motor Responses and Disfluencies in Normal Speakers Seventy-two college students were divided into three groups: Button Push-Speech (BP-S), Speech-Button Push (S-BP), and Control. BP-S subjects pushed one of two buttons on signal for 8 min. During the last 4 min, depression of the criterion button caused a buzzer to sound. After the button-push task, subjects spoke spontaneously ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1969
The Effects of a Neutral Stimulus (Buzzer) on Motor Responses and Disfluencies in Normal Speakers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard R. Martin
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Gerald M. Siegel
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1969
The Effects of a Neutral Stimulus (Buzzer) on Motor Responses and Disfluencies in Normal Speakers
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 179-184. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.179
History: Received July 18, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 179-184. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.179
History: Received July 18, 1968

Seventy-two college students were divided into three groups: Button Push-Speech (BP-S), Speech-Button Push (S-BP), and Control. BP-S subjects pushed one of two buttons on signal for 8 min. During the last 4 min, depression of the criterion button caused a buzzer to sound. After the button-push task, subjects spoke spontaneously for 30 min. During the last 20 min, the buzzer was presented contingent upon each disfluency. S-BP subjects were run under the same procedures, but the order of button-push and speech tasks was reversed. Control subjects followed the same procedures as S-BP subjects, but no buzzer signal was presented at any time.

Both S-BP and BP-S subjects emitted significantly fewer disfluencies during the last 20 min (Conditioning) than during the first 10 min (Baserate) of the speaking task. The frequency of disfluencies for Control subjects did not change significantly from Baserate to Conditioning. In none of the three groups did the frequency of pushes on the criterion button change significantly from minute to minute throughout the 8-min button-push session.

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