Hearing Studies of Telephone Operating Personnel This study represents a twofold effort to assess the acoustic noise exposure of telephone operating personnel. In one portion of the study, resting thresholds of hearing were measured for operating personnel whose technical duties require extended headset listening. In the other, detailed measurement of the amplitude distributions of sound levels ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1969
Hearing Studies of Telephone Operating Personnel
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Glorig
    Callier Hearing and Speech Center, Dallas, Texas
  • L. H. Whitney
    American Telephone and Telegraph Company, New York, New York
  • J. L. Flanagan
    Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey
  • N. Guttman
    Bell Telephone Laboratories, Murray Hill, New Jersey
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1969
Hearing Studies of Telephone Operating Personnel
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 169-178. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.169
History: Received September 18, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, March 1969, Vol. 12, 169-178. doi:10.1044/jshr.1201.169
History: Received September 18, 1968

This study represents a twofold effort to assess the acoustic noise exposure of telephone operating personnel. In one portion of the study, resting thresholds of hearing were measured for operating personnel whose technical duties require extended headset listening. In the other, detailed measurement of the amplitude distributions of sound levels encountered under actual operating conditions was carried out.

The audiological determinations, both of permanent resting threshold and temporary threshold shift, show that in all job categories, losses were negligible.

In direct support of the individual threshold measurements, the sound amplitude distributions, analyzed both in the laboratory and by computer processing, show that the levels measured under operating conditions are well within permissible ranges and constitute no potential hearing risk. The audiological measurements and the acoustic analyses, in combination, suggest that current practices and precautions for the conservation of hearing are fulfilling their objectives.

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