The Development of Constant Items for Speech Discrimination Testing Subjects were English-speaking adults with hearing impairment. Etiology of hearing loss did not enter into selection. Consonant errors were observed on speech discrimination test lists employing a closed-set response system. Fifteen subjects were employed for the first list and 20 each for the remaining four lists, with an occasional subject ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
The Development of Constant Items for Speech Discrimination Testing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elmer Owens
    University of California, San Francisco, California
  • Earl D. Schubert
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
The Development of Constant Items for Speech Discrimination Testing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 656-667. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.656
History: Received February 19, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 656-667. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.656
History: Received February 19, 1968

Subjects were English-speaking adults with hearing impairment. Etiology of hearing loss did not enter into selection. Consonant errors were observed on speech discrimination test lists employing a closed-set response system. Fifteen subjects were employed for the first list and 20 each for the remaining four lists, with an occasional subject serving in more than one group. Confusions between unvoiced and voiced consonants rarely occurred; the /r/ and /l/ were seldom confused with other phonemes; and nasals were seldom confused with non-nasals. Discrimination difficulty was related to both place and manner of articulation.

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