Vowel Discrimination of Hearing-Impaired Listeners Vowel discrimination ability was observed in two groups of 20 hearing-impaired subjects each. Each group listened to a different list of closed-set test items specifically designed for the study. A surprisingly low number of errors occurred, suggesting that vowel items in general lack the efficiency required for speech discrimination testing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
Vowel Discrimination of Hearing-Impaired Listeners
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elmer Owens
    University of California, San Francisco, California
  • Carolyn B. Talbott
    University of California, San Francisco, California
  • Earl D. Schubert
    Stanford University, Stanford, California
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
Vowel Discrimination of Hearing-Impaired Listeners
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 648-655. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.648
History: Received February 19, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 648-655. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.648
History: Received February 19, 1968

Vowel discrimination ability was observed in two groups of 20 hearing-impaired subjects each. Each group listened to a different list of closed-set test items specifically designed for the study. A surprisingly low number of errors occurred, suggesting that vowel items in general lack the efficiency required for speech discrimination testing using a closed-set response system. Among the most difficult phonemes to discriminate clearly were /ɔI/, /ɔ/, /au/, /ε/, /o/, and /α/. The phonemes most frequently substituted in error were adjacent to the stimulus phoneme on the Formant 1 versus Formant 2 vowel charts. The /u/ was the most frequent substitution for several vowels.

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