The Effect of a Conventional Versus a Nonoccluding (CROS-Type) Earmold upon the Frequency Response of a Hearing Aid Sound-field Bekesy audiograms were obtained from one experienced hearing-impaired subject wearing an ear-level hearing aid with a conventional earmold and a nonoccluding CROS-type earmold. Comparisons were made to determine the effects of the two different types of earmolds as well as different tubing lengths for nonoccluding CROS-type earmolds. Findings indicate: ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1968
The Effect of a Conventional Versus a Nonoccluding (CROS-Type) Earmold upon the Frequency Response of a Hearing Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David S. Green
    New Haven Hearing and Speech Center, New Haven, Connecticut
  • Mark Ross
    University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1968
The Effect of a Conventional Versus a Nonoccluding (CROS-Type) Earmold upon the Frequency Response of a Hearing Aid
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 638-647. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.638
History: Received February 16, 1968
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, September 1968, Vol. 11, 638-647. doi:10.1044/jshr.1103.638
History: Received February 16, 1968

Sound-field Bekesy audiograms were obtained from one experienced hearing-impaired subject wearing an ear-level hearing aid with a conventional earmold and a nonoccluding CROS-type earmold. Comparisons were made to determine the effects of the two different types of earmolds as well as different tubing lengths for nonoccluding CROS-type earmolds. Findings indicate: (1) A nonoccluding CROS-type earmold alters the frequency response characteristics of a hearing aid by markedly reducing the amplification for the low frequencies. (2) The length of tubing has a minor effect compared with that caused by the nonoccluding CROS ear coupler. (3) Sound-field Bekesy audiometry is a reliable and valid tool for assessing changes in the amplifying characteristics of hearing aids.

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